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Gold Panning In Barberton

gold_panning_queens_river_barberton

Queens River close to its source.
Hiking Trails. A number of Scenic Trails pass through streams that can be Panned. Join in the adventure to find your own gold and be instructed in the process by a qualified Gold Panner. Pan for alluvial gold in rivers where Gold was first discovered. The setting is ideal for spotting small game and birds.

Gold Panning experience includes: Accommodation. Transport to and from the Site. Instruction on Panning by the South African gold panning champion for the duration of two hours. Equipment: Pans, Spades, Gumboots and clean socks are supplied. Gold flakes and Nuggets are regularly found. According to SA Law any Gold found may not be removed, however any Gold found by Panners is mounted onto a small pan attached to a neck chain which is categorised as jewellery and may be retained by the Panner. After the panning session, relax at a Restaurant situated close by. Transport can also be arranged to and from Nelspruit and Kruger International Airport. To book for this exciting and profitable adventure contact: Barberton Gold Panning

bird_purple_crested_LourieBarberton Birds.
Purple Crested Lourie
Found in the area. Wing span of 90cm, eats fruit.
Illustration by Kenneth Newman

peacock_gold_nuggetPeacock Gold Nugget.
H W Peacock was a member of the Diggers' Committee. He discovered the famous Peacock gold nugget on 4 July 1912 at Coetzeestroom29, 1 km west of Kaapsche Hoop. It weighed 179,8 ounces (5,10 kg). It was purchased by Messrs Isidore Blankfield, Stewart Elington and G G Duncan (the B.E.D Syndicate) from the National Bank for £800. A model of this nugget was exhibited in Johannesburg in a glass case, while the original was disguised as a door stop in the home of G G Duncan, wrapped in green baize. Sufficient money was raised to take Blankfield to London where no one was interested in exhibiting the original nugget. It was then sold to the Bank of England and the syndicate lost £25 each on it. A model is in the British museum in London.
Acknowledgement Barberton Museum